demosthenes.info

I’m Dudley Storey, the author of Pro CSS3 Animation. This is my blog, where I talk about web design and development with , and . To receive more information, including news, updates, and tips, you should follow me on Twitter or add me on Google+.

web developer guide

my books

Book cover of Pro CSS3 AnimationPro CSS3 Animation, Apress, 2013

my projects

CSSslidy: an auto-generated #RWD image slider. 3.8K of JS, no JQuery. Drop in images, add a line of CSS. Done.

tipster.ioAutomatically provides local tipping customs and percentages for services anywhere.

Photograph of the Milky Way above the Mobius Arch in the Alabama Hills

A Complete Reading List For CSS

reading lists

Estimated reading time: 1 minute, 15 seconds

This resource addresses everything in CSS from selectors to filters, covering I would consider the fundamentals of Cascading Style Sheets: naturally, “complete” is a relative term. The list will be added to over time, as the CSS specification continues to grow: I have several series currently in production (including and ) that will be added in due course.

Each module contains supplementary material, recommended exercises, external references and suggested exercises. If you have feedback, corrections or suggestions, please feel free to contribute in the comments section below.

  1. Tunisia
  2. Botswana
  3. South Africa
  4. Kenya
  5. Nigeria
  6. Tanzania

A Custom Scrolling Element With Keyboard Accessibility

css / navigation

Estimated reading time: 3 minutes, 53 seconds

As a general rule, hiding important information inside a scrolling element is a poor idea, one more frequently used by designers because it “looks cool” rather than for solid UI reasons. But there are occasions when it’s necessary to do so… and when you do, the links inside still need to be via the keyboard.

How To Talk To A Developer

business

Estimated reading time: 2 minutes, 30 seconds

As a fresh semester starts up for me teaching web development, now seems a good time to talk about communication.

Communicating code and design problems is a skill, something that has to be learned by clients, students, and novice developers alike. You don’t need to be a fully-fledged programmer to ask questions, and you shouldn’t hesitate to ask for help, but gaining a positive resolution to your problem is far more likely if your conversation follows a few simple guidelines.

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